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LPI's Structural Integrity of Piping Ability

Piping has been used to transmit all manner of gases, fluids and solids for many millennia in many locales of human occupation. The assurance of structural integrity of such piping was primarily experiential (that is, if it didn’t fail, it wasn’t changed; if it did fail, it was repaired or modified). With the advent of steam power in the 19th century, these empirically-based approaches became increasingly impractical and often life-threatening as the frequency of high pressure pipe failures escalated at an alarming rate. The nascent world-wide engineering community of the 19th and early 20th centuries responded with development of methods that could be used to design, install and safely operate even higher pressure piping systems. However, the structural complexity of typical piping systems coupled with the very limited analytical tools available necessitated that these methods be kept relatively simple. The computer was to change dramatically this analytical archetype. By the late 1960’s, rapid computer evolution and the needs of the growing nuclear power industry coalesced. Sophisticated and increasingly efficient matrix inversion techniques were incorporated into some of the earliest basic structural software. The results were specialty piping analysis programs that allowed for rapid analysis of the typical 300 or so piping systems for which seismic adequacy was required by federal law to be demonstrated for every nuclear power plant under construction. The 1970’s experienced massive applications of such programs (and attendant massive manpower needs). The days of such large-scale analytical efforts have gone by but the piping software that was developed has remained (and dramatically improved). Indeed, such software now provides extremely valuable and efficient tools for evaluation of piping systems in many industries worldwide. At LPI, we use a variety of such programs to tackle a diverse group of client projects that may involve failure investigations (yes, there still are failures), anomalous operational conditions or new design. Our engineers have several decades of experience founded on the basics of the early manual approaches to piping analysis and the evolution into today’s computer-based methods. For more information, please contact Paul Streeter at pstreeter@lpiny.com.

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Highlights

LPI's Structural Integrity of Piping Ability
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At LPI, we use a variety of such programs to tackle a diverse group of client projects that may involve failure investigations, anomalous operational conditions, or new design.

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